Seraph

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Posts posted by Seraph


  1. I don't think so as I've seen others have something similar, including Datsyuk. I'm not even convinced it is a 13. The reason I don't think it's Kozlov is because there is clearly a letter of some sort missing from what you see in every other autograph of his I've seen.

    Edit...can't find the Datysuk one I was thinking of, so maybe I'm off there....but Datysuk has some crazy different autographs.

    Edit again....so Kozlov is the closest match so far, but I still don't think that's it...it's killing me and I'm not sure why. I'd love to get some sort of confirmation :)

    I think he probably forgot the K in a hurry.


  2. In alot of cases this may be accurate, but in this situation IMO this way of thinking is too simplistic. In the case of Fedorov, people that have to "discuss it" are people who are using emotion to cloud their judgement. Had Fedorov had his career cut short in 2003 due to injury and not leaving to Anaheim, I think he would be in the same category as Lidstrom & Yzerman.

    Here are my thoughts:

    I've come around on Fedorov. The guy is one of the greatest to ever wear the Winged Wheel, and he should be up there with LIdstrom/Yzerman.

    Datsyuk IMO was a very special player, one that not many people have the same skill set as. Based on that alone, and based on how good he was a as two way player at his peak, I would say yes. He may not have the point totals, but imagine if his body didnt let him down, and imagine if he played in a different era where there was more scoring.

    Z - How can you say no to him and Yes to Datsyuk.

    Osgood - At this point no, but I see the argument as he accomplished ALOT and if he gets into the HHOF, that could alter my opinion.

    That's just the thing, there are no defined requirements to retire a number. It just has to do with precedent and "how the franchise feels," which I think emotion has a lot to do with. Why do you think they took Larry Aurie out of the rafters? His accomplishments stand, but his number didn't. Yes, all of the players you mention have a very special place in Red Wings history and are elite players, but 100 years from now, looking back, I don't think they will mean the same to the franchise as Yzerman or Lidstrom, much less the production line and the Red Wings dynasty of the 40s-50s.

    The other point I'll make is this. Retiring Ted Lindsay, Alex Delvecchio Sid Abel and Sawchuk's numbers were also in discussions.

    Only Howe, Yzerman and Lidstrom were players whose numbers were immediately retired.

    Lindsay and Delvecchio had their numbers retired in 1991

    Sawchuck was retired in 1994

    Abel in 1995

    Discussing is completely unrelated to likelihood of retirement. Sid Abel retired from the game in 1954 and his number wasn't retired till 40 years after that.

    I would love to see you start a thread and call into discussion whether we should have retired Lindsay, Delvecchio, Abel and Sawchuck.

    These are players from a dynasty of league domination and five Stanley cups. The production line included players in contention to be the top 1, 2 and 3 leading scorers year after year. Thumbing through the history books, you will always notice that blip of tremendous success. Again, this sets a precedent for future retired jerseys and looking back, I only see Yzerman and Lidstrom contributing in the same type of way. Yzerman captained this team for nearly 2 decades and brought them to championship caliber. Lidstrom is arguably the best defenseman of all time, captaining the team to an additional cup after Yzerman.


  3. This is just so the boys can party on the road in Vegas for a couple years. I am thinking the away team will have a bad record there playing on a hangover. Then they will move somewhere deserving.

    What a blunder. Seattle or Portland are open markets. They are so bored there that soccer is huge. Now that's a statement.


  4. The 20-year naming rights agreement averaging more than $6.25 million per year paves the way for Little Caesars Arena branding on the roof of the arena, on the exterior, at entrances and at center ice, among other opportunities.

    Source: http://www.districtdetroit.com/news/little-caesars-arena-announced-as-name-of-detroits-new-multi-use-arena-centerpiece-of-1-2-billion-district-detroit-development

    Correct me if I am wrong, but I haven't seen anyone mention that the Hockeytown center ice logo is to be scrapped. We get a Little Caesars logo there too it seems. I guess we aren't Hockeytown anymore either. We are Hot-N-Ready-Town.


  5. I remember McCarty having some hidden talent that would pop up out of no where in games. I also remember reading he had crazy raw talent and could have been much better had he worked on his game and not been so distracted.

    I am pretty sure the people who remember McCarty's play would take him over Abby. I would.


  6. I'd never knock the hockey genius of Scottie Bowman. However, once you've developed a reputation as a winner, you end up choosing who you work for rather than developing teams from scratch. I think it's unlikely that Bowman was the factor that brought 3 cups to Chicago. Rather, it's more likely he had the hockey mind to see the potential of the team years in advance.

    I think successful coaches, GMs, and other personnel in professional sports have a tendency to snowball on their own success. Their padded resume allows them to work with future winners more often.


  7. Fedorov will not go up. He may have smoothed over relations with the club, but I don't think he can recover back to where he would be put in the rafters. It's the right precedent to set.

    Z and Pav have not earned it yet. Yzerman and Lidstrom brought the team out of obscurity and made it a premiere hockey club where free agents wanted to play. They built a dynasty with 3 and 4 cups each. Z and Pav are far from that type of accomplishment. I think to be in the rafters it takes more than goals and assists. It requires the player to elevate the club to new heights and make a massive contribution.