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Toronto might get a second NHL team.


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#61 miller76

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Posted 24 October 2008 - 01:09 AM

Bettmans take on this second team in Toronto crap.

http://www.thefourth.../nhl081023.html
lighten up people, it's the internet!

#62 MacK_Attack

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Posted 24 October 2008 - 01:32 AM

QUOTE (eva unit zero @ October 23, 2008 - 02:33PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>

As you can see, London is the third most populous metro area that does not currently have a local NHL team. The other two have both lost theirs within the past fifteen years due. Winnipeg had low fan turnout and no corporate support, so I would not support attempting to return there. Quebec had strong fan support but poor corporate support due to the Montreal Canadiens culture, so a return might be difficult. This makes London the top choice for adding a team to Canada unless we are choosing to oversaturate a market. It is in an area that should provide strong attendance, and the corporate support should not be an issue. I would, however, not have included London or Hamilton had the topic not been about expansion into the Toronto area.


London won't get overflow from Toronto like Hamilton would. Nobody is going to do a 2+ hour drive to London from Toronto (and probably at least three hours with traffic on the 401) on a weeknight in the winter. That can be a ghastly drive once you get out of the GTA.

Whereas in Hamilton, they're currently working out the logistics of building a light-rail line from downtown Hamilton to Union Station in Toronto. There's already the GO train line, as well. It'll probably be possible to get from downtown Toronto to Copps Coliseum without having to drive at all or transfer trains. It is technically possible now, but it takes at least one train transfer just outside Hamilton.

15,000 people trying to get season tickets for a Hamilton team surely can't be a sign of over-saturation.

Also, a team in Hamilton requires a less-costly renovation of Copps Coliseum, where a team in London likely requires a new arena in a city that just built a 10,000 seat OHL arena. That's also another issue, you'd lose a team with history like the London Knights, but Hamilton would gladly see the Bulldogs go for an NHL team.

If London was closer to Toronto, it would be an option, but it's simply too far away. Kitchener/Waterloo might be as far away from Toronto as you can get without damaging the overflow from Toronto.

Edited by MacK_Attack, 24 October 2008 - 01:39 AM.


#63 eva unit zero

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Posted 24 October 2008 - 09:02 AM

QUOTE (MacK_Attack @ October 24, 2008 - 02:32AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
London won't get overflow from Toronto like Hamilton would. Nobody is going to do a 2+ hour drive to London from Toronto (and probably at least three hours with traffic on the 401) on a weeknight in the winter. That can be a ghastly drive once you get out of the GTA.

Whereas in Hamilton, they're currently working out the logistics of building a light-rail line from downtown Hamilton to Union Station in Toronto. There's already the GO train line, as well. It'll probably be possible to get from downtown Toronto to Copps Coliseum without having to drive at all or transfer trains. It is technically possible now, but it takes at least one train transfer just outside Hamilton.

15,000 people trying to get season tickets for a Hamilton team surely can't be a sign of over-saturation.

Also, a team in Hamilton requires a less-costly renovation of Copps Coliseum, where a team in London likely requires a new arena in a city that just built a 10,000 seat OHL arena. That's also another issue, you'd lose a team with history like the London Knights, but Hamilton would gladly see the Bulldogs go for an NHL team.

If London was closer to Toronto, it would be an option, but it's simply too far away. Kitchener/Waterloo might be as far away from Toronto as you can get without damaging the overflow from Toronto.


I included London merely because it was a large population center in Southern Ontario. I leave Hamilton out because if you assume that there truly is this mythical "Toronto Overflow" that would justify having a second team, then currently it should be helping prop up the Sabres, right? Hamilton is halfway between the two, so it's reasonable to argue that hockey fans from Hamilton who cannot get Leafs tickets should go to Sabres games instead, right? Well, Buffalo has consistently had trouble filling their arena. Imagine what happens to that team when you add another team in Hamilton?
I'm not concerned about the welfare of the Maple Leafs. They'll be fine. It's the Sabres who are the team that will suffer. If a team is to move to Hamilton, the ONLY logical choice is the obvious one; the Buffalo Sabres. Here's an analogy.
Two patients are in the hospital. One is a senior, has several chronic illnesses, has been a severe alcoholic all his life and only has his left kidney. The other has kidney cancer, localized to the same kidney and causing the kidney to fail. The cancer patient is otherwise the paragon of health. What you are basically suggesting is removing the cancer patient's right, healthy kidney and giving it to the senior, thus directly and imediately placing the cancer patient's life in danger.

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