• Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
GMRwings1983

Russia/Canada Revisit the Summit Series

Rate this topic

42 posts in this topic

Well, it should!

"Here's a shot. Henderson makes a wild stab for it and falls. Here's another shot. Right in front. They Score!! Henderson has scored for Canada!"

- Mr. Foster William Hewitt, September 28, 1972.

"Cournoyer qui s'avance. Oh, Henderson a perdu la passe! Il a fait une chute. Et devant le but. ET LE BUT DE HENDERSON! Avec 34 secondes encore!"

- Mr. René Lecavalier, September 28, 1972.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That's pretty amazing, particularly after watching the recent documentary about the Series on NBC Sports it is pretty obvious that some of those guys really still don't like one another. That series made the Wings/Avs rivalry look like a picnic!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Stuff about Team Canada and the Summit Series:

1) Of the thirty-five man roster, seven players played in all eight games, while five played in none.

2) Fifteen players have been elected into the Hockey Hall of Fame; two of them played no games.

3) Two goaltenders played the same number of games.

4) "The Slash" was arguably the turning point of the Series, although both Canadians would later diminish their roles.

5) One player scored three game-winning goals and, except for USSR comebacks, would have had two more.

6) In the blink of an eye, the same moment is captured by two different individuals.

7) Game Four was important for two major reasons:

A) Phil Esposito gave his famous post-game speech and

B) The fans reaction, both during and following the game, was embarrassing to both the players and to the rest of the country. This was the touchstone game of why people have come to realize that Vancouver has some of the most ignorant hockey "fans" in all of Canada.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Stuff about Team Canada and the Summit Series:

1) Of the thirty-five man roster, seven players played in all eight games, while five played in none.

2) Fifteen players have been elected into the Hockey Hall of Fame; two of them played no games.

3) Two goaltenders played the same number of games.

4) "The Slash" was arguably the turning point of the Series, although both Canadians would later diminish their roles.

5) One player scored three game-winning goals and, except for USSR comebacks, would have had two more.

6) In the blink of an eye, the same moment is captured by two different individuals.

7) Game Four was important for two major reasons:

A) Phil Esposito gave his famous post-game speech and

B) The fans reaction, both during and following the game, was embarrassing to both the players and to the rest of the country. This was the touchstone game of why people have come to realize that Vancouver has some of the most ignorant hockey "fans" in all of Canada.

That's some outstanding and informative stuff, thanks buddy!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've always hated Bobby Clarke, mostly because of "The Slash"

I realize the competition was heated and was the most important series in hockey history, but that was plain bulls***. If I played on team Russia, I would have pulled a Marty McSorley on him in retaliation.

Namingway likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Stuff about Team Canada and the Summit Series:

1) Of the thirty-five man roster, seven players played in all eight games, while five played in none.

2) Fifteen players have been elected into the Hockey Hall of Fame; two of them played no games.

3) Two goaltenders played the same number of games.

4) "The Slash" was arguably the turning point of the Series, although both Canadians would later diminish their roles.

5) One player scored three game-winning goals and, except for USSR comebacks, would have had two more.

6) In the blink of an eye, the same moment is captured by two different individuals.

7) Game Four was important for two major reasons:

A) Phil Esposito gave his famous post-game speech and

B) The fans reaction, both during and following the game, was embarrassing to both the players and to the rest of the country. This was the touchstone game of why people have come to realize that Vancouver has some of the most ignorant hockey "fans" in all of Canada.

I can always count on you to give great info :thumbup:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've always hated Bobby Clarke, mostly because of "The Slash"

I realize the competition was heated and was the most important series in hockey history, but that was plain bulls***. If I played on team Russia, I would have pulled a Marty McSorley on him in retaliation.

I think Canadians would sooner look at it as payback. Payback for all the great Canadian players who had to put up with the "Soviet Backcheck". You know, "tap, tap, tap", at the backs of their legs and their ankles, by defencemen and forwards alike as they were skating back up the ice, knowing full well that the odds of not being caught the the referees were in they're favour. Sure it was gutless, but they did it because they got away with it. Remember too that at that point in the Series, the Soviets had a 3-1 advantage (with 1 tie). Message sent, message understood.

Z Winged Dangler likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

For anyone interested in reading up on that historic series, "Cold War", by Roy Macskimming, is a really good book on the subject.

Also, "Canada's Team Of The Century" dvd set, which has all 8 complete games.

I also have the documentary "Summit On Ice", produced by CBC, which I believe was first shown in 1992.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've always hated Bobby Clarke, mostly because of "The Slash"

I realize the competition was heated and was the most important series in hockey history, but that was plain bulls***. If I played on team Russia, I would have pulled a Marty McSorley on him in retaliation.

Or if you played on Russia you could kick someone, oh wait that already did happen. I dont like when people act like the soviets were innocent little europeans and Bobby Clarke had to juust break one of their ankles to win. That slash was an answer to all the dirty s*** the Canadians were putting up with at the time and all the other crap the Russians did. Officiating to the point that a player almost slashes a ref across the head, telling the Canadians none of their wives can come because there isnt any room in the hotels.

A dirty play got answered by dirty play, especially in that series which was more about politics then hockey

Z Winged Dangler likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Or if you played on Russia you could kick someone, oh wait that already did happen. I dont like when people act like the soviets were innocent little europeans and Bobby Clarke had to juust break one of their ankles to win. That slash was an answer to all the dirty s*** the Canadians were putting up with at the time and all the other crap the Russians did. Officiating to the point that a player almost slashes a ref across the head, telling the Canadians none of their wives can come because there isnt any room in the hotels.

A dirty play got answered by dirty play, especially in that series which was more about politics then hockey

If politics mattered so much, maybe Canada should have declared war on the Soviets................oh wait

I understand it was a tense series. Hell, it was probably the most tense series in hockey history. But the Soviets only started doing dirty s*** when the Canadians did it first. They came into the series just wanting to play a clean game, and weren't used to the rough stuff. I don't think the Soviets knew how to respond properly to that type of hockey, so they did crazy stuff after whistles, instead of dropping the gloves.

At the same time, I don't think the Soviets ever sent a player out there to deliberately injure someone. It was a pathetic move by Clarke and the coach.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

One of the proudest moments in Canadian history should be one of the most embarrassing, we had to cheat in a most despicable manner to win it.

If I was on the ice even as a member of Team Canada I would have 2 handed Clarke across the face. The world would be a better place without pieces of s*** like that

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There was a reason they were called the "Central Red Army", wasn't there? Oh yeah.

They were called a Soviet National Team. The Red Army team was one of the teams in the Soviet top league. The two are not the same. I doubt there were more then 9 (at most 10) Red Army players in that series. Also, if your comment was meant to justify Clarke's act, I always thought that deliberately imjuring an opponent crosses the line from playing the game to no rules war. If that were the Soviets attitude, they had only to arrange for a couple of car accidents, a food poisoning in the Team Canada hotel, a traffic jam or a team bus breakdown, and the series would have been theirs. Would you consider that type of behavior justified? To me , this doing this sort of things in order to win only devalues your victory..

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If politics mattered so much, maybe Canada should have declared war on the Soviets................oh wait

I understand it was a tense series. Hell, it was probably the most tense series in hockey history. But the Soviets only started doing dirty s*** when the Canadians did it first. They came into the series just wanting to play a clean game, and weren't used to the rough stuff. I don't think the Soviets knew how to respond properly to that type of hockey, so they did crazy stuff after whistles, instead of dropping the gloves.

At the same time, I don't think the Soviets ever sent a player out there to deliberately injure someone. It was a pathetic move by Clarke and the coach.

Thats just not true, I dont mind saying Canada played dirty but I hate when people play innocent Russian card like this. Canada came out playing hard, physical hockey, but not terribly dirty. The Russians responded with dirty play because they didnt know how to answer it. How can you act like that was the worst thing of the series when Mikhailov kicked Bergman twice until he was bleeding?

Canada played it dirty but the Soviets werent a bunch of cupcakes

Z Winged Dangler likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Absolutely, positively nothing devalues Team Canada's victory in the Summit Series.

IMO, Clarke's actions devalue him as a human being, and his coach too. Also, that slash knocked out the best Soviet player (Kharlamov) effectively for the rest of the series. Who knows what might have been?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

IMO, Clarke's actions devalue him as a human being, and his coach too. Also, that slash knocked out the best Soviet player (Kharlamov) effectively for the rest of the series. Who knows what might have been?

It tarnished the series, but Canada's win was legitimate and an impressive comeback. Seems like the Russians relaxed after being up 3-1-1 in the series.

Funny thing is, in Russia, they never think of this series as a loss. They look at it more as them proving to the world that they're just as good at hockey as the Canadians. No one thought so before the series. At the end of the day, the series did more for Russian hockey than it did for Canadian hockey.

Edited by GMRwings1983

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Also, that slash knocked out the best Soviet player (Kharlamov) effectively for the rest of the series.

By the term "best", did you mean the leading scorer amongst the Soviet players? if so, he wasn't.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

By the term "best", did you mean the leading scorer amongst the Soviet players? if so, he wasn't.

No, I meant the best player, besides (possibly) Tretiak. Yakushev was the best scorer, but Kharlamov played fewer games and some of them on fractured ankle. Nevertheless he was the best player on that team, without him the top line seriously lost effectiveness.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

For anyone interested in reading up on that historic series, "Cold War", by Roy Macskimming, is a really good book on the subject.

Also, "Canada's Team Of The Century" dvd set, which has all 8 complete games.

I also have the documentary "Summit On Ice", produced by CBC, which I believe was first shown in 1992.

there's also a movie on the series with Gerry Dee...and it's awesome!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0