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Guest RedWingsDad

Hudler's Father

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I knew he had died, (watched the Calgary openning games to see Juri play), but hadn't realized his young age. Curious that they don't go into what he died from.

Edited by T.Low

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As someone who has lost both parents, I know how devastating this can be. And also as someone who is older than his father was, I can't even imagine how that must feel. My heart goes out to Jiri. I know he isn't here anymore, but I cannot help but be sad for him.

55fan likes this

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Eye opening. My dad is older than that and I would never consider losing him anytime soon.

I hope you are able to spend some quality time with your old man, cause you never know. But mainly, It's nice to hear that you care and are concerned about his well being.

I'm in my late 40's, in all appearences still healthy and strong (still mountain bike and skate, etc)) but was diagnosed with Lou Gehrig's disease recently, so statistically speaking, I've got about 1 yr of being physically able (albeit in decline), then about 3 more years of...whatever, I'm not exactly sure, I just know it's going to suck (and it's gonna suck a lot more if i gotta lie in bed and watch the Wings stink up the joint!). And I waited a long time before getting married and having kids, so unfortunately my kids are both under 2 1/2 years old.

I hesistate to post this, cause I certainly don't want to make this thread about me, but thouht maybe it could be a good reminder to everyone to hug your loved ones whenever you can, because life throws a lot of devasting blindside hits and it doesn't discriminate.

Condolences to Juri, his family, and friends.

T-Ruff and Hockeymom1960 like this

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TLow, My heart goes out to you. I had a second cousin diagnosed with ALS, and luckily he was able to make it for quite a while before it finally got him. It isn't easy to live with. But you're right...live your life as best you can...savor the moments that you can do the things you love. ALS is a terrible fate...long, lingering diseases are a ***** (my parents both had long, lingering ailments). Good luck.

Hockeymom1960 likes this

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Thanks for the little piece of your heart, Kira, I'll put it to good use.

I'm sorry you had to go through those experiences. No one should have to go through experiences like that.

As corny as it may sound, I actually look to Steve Yzerman's 2002 Stanley Cup Playoff experience as an example of how to live out my remaining years. His body let him down, but he did not let that stop him from making a difference. When others would have lied down and quit with an injury like that, he instead rose above it and went on to inspire some of the greatest players in the world to become even greater still.

My strategy is to not dwell in the bitterness and anger that comes with getting ALS, but rather use that energy to open my mind to become a problem solver; find and implement solutions to my new challenges, and concentrate on the things I can indeed do rather than focus on the things I am not able to do anymore. To be an example to my family to not let circumstances slow you down and get you off your game; to keep your eye on the prize, focus on whats important in life, to inspire them push through their perceived barriers to get the most of out their lives. Easier said than done, I know,...but then so is everything. And what the hell else have I got to do; it's either shrivel up and die or go for it and try to leave a legacy for my little girls to draw strength, courage, and love from.

Thanks Kira, Puckloo, and 55Fan. Plan for the future; live for today. Go WIngs!

Edited by T.Low

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I hope you are able to spend some quality time with your old man, cause you never know. But mainly, It's nice to hear that you care and are concerned about his well being.

I'm in my late 40's, in all appearences still healthy and strong (still mountain bike and skate, etc)) but was diagnosed with Lou Gehrig's disease recently, so statistically speaking, I've got about 1 yr of being physically able (albeit in decline), then about 3 more years of...whatever, I'm not exactly sure, I just know it's going to suck (and it's gonna suck a lot more if i gotta lie in bed and watch the Wings stink up the joint!). And I waited a long time before getting married and having kids, so unfortunately my kids are both under 2 1/2 years old.

I hesistate to post this, cause I certainly don't want to make this thread about me, but thouht maybe it could be a good reminder to everyone to hug your loved ones whenever you can, because life throws a lot of devasting blindside hits and it doesn't discriminate.

Condolences to Juri, his family, and friends.

You sir are very brave. I wish you and your family all the best in this world. I'll be sure to spend as much time with my family as I can.

55fan, T.Low and Hockeymom1960 like this

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Feel very bad for Jiri. I lost my old man when he was only 56 years old when he succumbed to AML Leukemia. He was diagnosed around Halloween 2002 and passed away just after new years 2003 after going through horrific chemotherapy to prepare for a bone marrow transplant. It was really shocking how he could go from playing men's hockey and in what seemed to be great shape to passing away in less than 3 months time. Unfortunately, he never got a chance to meet his two grandsons, but his legacy lives on in me, my brothers, and my sons. My oldest who is 8 now(in my avatar pic) even sports #9 in soccer for his Grandpa, who was as big a Wings fan there ever was and idolized Gordie Howe growing up playing river hockey in Detroit.


My heart goes out to you T.Lowe & your family. Since you are younger & still physically fit, with the exponentially increasing advancements in technology & medicine there is ever increasing hope of slowing the progression in the future. Hopefully your progression will mirror that of Stephen Hawking, who this year will mark his 50th year since he was 1st diagnosed with ALS. I wish you the best.

T.Low and puckloo39 like this

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T. Low, best of luck as you face those challenges. You seem to have the right mindset to fight it well. Your comment about loved ones is VERY true. My father has taken it to heart after having an LVAD put in last spring. You and your family are in my prayers.

Condolences to Jiri. My Dad is 72 and it was hard to face the possibility of losing him. I can't begin to imagine what it would have been like to lose him as early as Jiri has lost his.

T.Low likes this

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I lost my mom and dad when I was in my twenties, one to a long-term debilitating illness/stroke and the other to catastrophic cancer with just one-year survival. after diagnosis. It was a while ago, but one doesn't get over it soon. This will doubtless affect Jiri, so I hope he has a support system. It weirds me out a bit to know that people my age still have living parents - especially when they are not close to them while they are all alive and have the opportunity to be a family. In a way, I was lucky to know my time with them both was limited. I treasured the time I had with them on Earth.

T, you know I am thinking of you. I know you're strong and will deal with this situation accordingly. One of my acquaintances once said, "I don't know how you dealt with losing both your parents when you were so young." I don't recall being given a choice, actually. You play the hand you are dealt, if you're smart.

You're smart! I know you will be a winner in this game, and will handle it magnificently.

T.Low and 55fan like this

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Juri watch:

I had the Calgary game on last night in the garage as I was working on my motorcycles, Juri's first game in a Flames uni.

He actually played really hard, and really well. He was on the ice for a lot of the 3rd period during crunch time, making great passes, protecting the puck, getting knocked around a lot, of course, and getting a lot of praise from Kelly Hrudey, especially for exhibiting great early chemistry with linemates Matt Stajan and fellow Czech, NHL newcomer Roman Cervenka, on the Flames 2nd line.

He drew a penalty and Hrudey attributed it to Hudler's speed :eh: and his smarts of keeping his feet moving.

Seemed like every time I looked at the tv, he was on the ice, so I finally just sat down and watched the last 15 minutes of the 3rd period.

While Juri did skate with Iginla and Cammy on the top line at Friday nite's practice, Coach Hartley decided it would be more benefitial to have him team up with Cervenka as it was his first game in the NHL, and hopefully Hudler could make the transition from the KHL a bit easier for him.

Good game, Happy. Somewhere, his father is poud.

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T.Low...best of luck to you...been through it with a close friend...I admire your strength and attitude...

T.Low likes this

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I think ( and I hope) that Jiri will use this for inspiration. I know that his dad was the one who went with him when he was a kid and went to all his games and practices and things. So hopefully that will be his inspiration for overcoming the sadness of it.

T.Low likes this

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