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Kris Letang Suffers Stroke


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#21 rrasco

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Posted 07 February 2014 - 07:15 PM

Could you tell us a little bit about the symptoms? 

 

I'm not clear on what Letang went through (after googling), they only say dizziness and it wasn't major, but I thought with a stroke half your face and body stop working (according again to google).  So what exactly is going on that you say, 'I'm dizzy, no, that's a stroke'. 

 

There was actually a commercial series I remember seeing in the last few years about being able to identify someone having a stroke.  I don't remember if this was it, but it is similar and has a URL where you can learn more about identifying strokes.

 

http://www.ispot.tv/...n-spot-a-stroke


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#22 Echolalia

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Posted 07 February 2014 - 07:55 PM

I literally JUST learned about strokes in my neuro class (also concussions but that's for another thread)... Exam is on Monday!

Anyway, strokes are essentially when certain parts of the brain don't get enough blood flow and those cells which are affected die. Most people generally associate strokes with losing muscle movement/sensation on half the body and/or disruption in speech, and that usually occurs when a particular artery (called the middle cerebral artery) becomes compromised. But strokes can exhibit themselves in many different ways, depending on what part of the brain is affected.
In Letang's case, having a patent foramen ovale introduces irregular blood flow mechanics and may allow a clot to form and bypass the lungs. The article mentions dizziness as one of his symptoms which is common with strokes that occur from occlusion or hemmorhage to the vertebrobasillar artery. This artery supplies the brainstem, cerebellum and visual cortex, so it would seem that the clot that formed (assuming that's even what happened) traveled to the back of the brain/brainstem where motor coordination, vision, and a few other things are regulated, and impeded blood flow to these areas. I can't speak for Letang's case specifically, but it is common to also experience double vision, difficulty swallowing, as well as disequilibrium and vertigo for vertebrobasillar artery strokes (just in case any of you experience one in the future you know now what to look for).
The article mentioned that he would be back on the ice though, so that's certainly good news. Strokes are serious business.

Edited by Echolalia, 07 February 2014 - 08:08 PM.


#23 Red Kingdom

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Posted 07 February 2014 - 08:08 PM

I literally JUST learned about strokes in my neuro class (also concussions but that's for another thread)... Exam is on Monday!

Anyway, strokes are essentially when certain parts of the brain don't get enough blood flow and those cells which are affected die. Most people generally associate strokes with losing muscle movement/sensation on half the body and/or disruption in speech, and that usually occurs when a particular artery (called the middle cerebral artery) becomes compromised. But strokes can exhibit themselves in many different ways, depending on what part of the brain is affected.
In Letang's case, having a patent foramen ovale introduces irregular blood flow mechanics and may allow a clot to form. The article mentions dizziness as one of his symptoms which is common with strokes that occur from occlusion or hemmorhage to the vertebrobasillar artery. This artery supplies the brainstem, cerebellum and visual cortex, so it would seem that the clot that formed (assuming that's even what happened) traveled to the back of the brain/brainstem where motor coordination, vision, and a few other things are regulated, and impeded blood flow to these areas. I can't speak for Letang's case specifically, but it is common to also experience double vision, difficulty swallowing, as well as disequilibrium and vertigo for vertebrobasillar artery strokes (just in case any of you experience one in the future you know now what to look for).
The article mentioned that he would be back on the ice though, so that's certainly good news. Strokes are serious business

 

Darren Dreger just spoke about this on NHL Network a few minutes ago. Dreger said Letang suffered a few of those symptoms you mentioned in your post. Dizzieness, double or blurry vision, trouble with his balance.


Edited by Red Kingdom, 07 February 2014 - 08:10 PM.


#24 Red Kingdom

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Posted 07 February 2014 - 08:19 PM

I had to give up hockey at a young age because of heart-related health issues. I'd always known there was something wrong with me health-wise, but it wasn't until I'd started really pushing my body to its limits that the true problem reared its very ugly head. Now that I'm older, I appreciate that it was probably a major blessing. By bringing out this issue I didn't even know I had, hockey might have saved my life in the long run. And this was before the Fischer incident and everything that's followed, all of which makes me really worry about high-level athletes. You could be in "top shape" and yet you might also be a ticking time bomb, and without even knowing. It's scary. It puts things in perspective.

 

Sorry, that all probably seems narcisstic. Just felt like sharing.

 

Dabura, if you don't mind, what type of heart condition was it? I ask because about 13 yrs ago, I was diagnosed with a heart condition called Hypertrophic Cardiomyapathy. I had an enlarged muslce in the heart that affected the flow of blood out of the heart. A lot of much younger athletes have this and sometimes, they can go into sudden cardiac arrest and die. That's why there's a push on right now in the metro Detroit area every summer for high school athletes to have tests done to see how their hearts are. I was in my mid-50's when I was diagnosed. I had open heart surgery in 07 at 59 to correct it and so far, seven yrs later I have had no problems, though I was told that eventually I could go into congestive heart failure. So, I was just wondering if yours might be similar to mine. I know there are several forms of Cardiomyapathy, besides the one I had. And to this day, I think it was the same thing Jiri Fisher had when he nearly died during the game several yrs back.



#25 dropkickshanahans

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Posted 08 February 2014 - 12:41 AM

 

There was actually a commercial series I remember seeing in the last few years about being able to identify someone having a stroke.  I don't remember if this was it, but it is similar and has a URL where you can learn more about identifying strokes.

 

http://www.ispot.tv/...n-spot-a-stroke

 

I remember this female reporter that had a stroke on air and didn't even know it a couple years ago. From her perspective, nothing was wrong and she was doing her job, but to the viewers and people associated with her, she was saying things like "heavy bertation" and speaking gibberish. It was pretty scary, I've never seen something like that before and always thought a stroke meant half of your body was unfunctional. Thankfully she's ok afaik, and thankfully it sounds like Letang will be alright and it won't be career ending.



#26 Bramsy

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Posted 08 February 2014 - 01:04 AM

ANOTHER ONE!  

 

A few years ago I had a stroke, at a young age, while being a very active athlete...  Teddy Bruschi (NE Patriot) had one while I was in recovery.  Mine was major but I thankfully regained a ton being young, athletic and just plain stubborn.  

 

It's a scary thing to have happen!  I mean very scary.

 

I am very happy to see Letang have a chance of resuming his career as did Teddy Bruschi.  I have permanent damage and look hammered drunk when I walk.

 

I hate seeing stroke gain popularity, but it IS growing, and cringe every time I read it.


Edited by Bramsy, 08 February 2014 - 02:46 AM.

nothing witty



#27 Gizmo

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Posted 08 February 2014 - 08:42 AM

I assume this is what Letang has: http://www.nhlbi.nih...ics/topics/pda/

Our daughter was diagnosed with PDA a month or so after she was born. It closed eventually on its own. Otherwise we were told she might require surgery.
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#28 Hockeymom1960

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Posted 08 February 2014 - 10:00 AM

Prayers going out for Kris and his family.  Even though I hate the Pens, I never ever want anything bad to happen to any player.



#29 Kira

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Posted 08 February 2014 - 10:21 AM

Sometimes it takes something like this to bring a problem to the surface.  My husband had a stroke at 33  Scared the absolute hell out of both of us.  But it showed something that we knew he had, but hadn't been properly diagnosed.  They did an EEG (electroencephalogram), and it showed that he has temporal lobe epilepsy.  We knew he had the problem but they told us that up until that time, they didn't really know how to read the EEGs to find it (this was the mid-80's, mind you).

 

Since then, we know that science has vastly improved.  By something like this happening now, it might just have saved his life.  Hopefully with time to heal, proper medication and care, he can have a long life.  May cut his career short, but in the long run that would probably be a small setback.  Good luck, Kris - I hate your team with a purple passion, but I wish you well.


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#30 Kira

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Posted 08 February 2014 - 10:26 AM

 

Dabura, if you don't mind, what type of heart condition was it? I ask because about 13 yrs ago, I was diagnosed with a heart condition called Hypertrophic Cardiomyapathy. I had an enlarged muslce in the heart that affected the flow of blood out of the heart. A lot of much younger athletes have this and sometimes, they can go into sudden cardiac arrest and die. That's why there's a push on right now in the metro Detroit area every summer for high school athletes to have tests done to see how their hearts are. I was in my mid-50's when I was diagnosed. I had open heart surgery in 07 at 59 to correct it and so far, seven yrs later I have had no problems, though I was told that eventually I could go into congestive heart failure. So, I was just wondering if yours might be similar to mine. I know there are several forms of Cardiomyapathy, besides the one I had. And to this day, I think it was the same thing Jiri Fisher had when he nearly died during the game several yrs back.

 

 

My hubby has cardiomyopathy as well.  I've had to learn a lot about this the last few years.  I know what you're going through.


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#31 puckloo39

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Posted 08 February 2014 - 11:16 AM

Best wishes to Kris, hope for a full recovery and that he can carry on with life and his career.  I also hope his team loses miserably, but that's another issue entirely and has nothing to do with him, personally.  ;)

 

I hope the medical staff checked our Monster for this sort of thing, when he had to come out of the crease during the last game, with dizziness.  He's so tall, and while i am no medical expert, I wonder about heart issues and circulation problems with people who are tall and gangly like he is.  I forget the name of the syndrome but one of you more knowledgeable medicos will know what I am thinking of...

 

Get better soon, Kris!!


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#32 Wheelchairsuperhero

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Posted 08 February 2014 - 11:27 AM

Best wishes to Kris, hope for a full recovery and that he can carry on with life and his career.  I also hope his team loses miserably, but that's another issue entirely and has nothing to do with him, personally.  ;)
 
I hope the medical staff checked our Monster for this sort of thing, when he had to come out of the crease during the last game, with dizziness.  He's so tall, and while i am no medical expert, I wonder about heart issues and circulation problems with people who are tall and gangly like he is.  I forget the name of the syndrome but one of you more knowledgeable medicos will know what I am thinking of...
 
Get better soon, Kris!!

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