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NHL lacks class.


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#21 Wings_Dynasty

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Posted 28 April 2014 - 11:08 AM

Classy doesn't win Cups. Name a team that won on "class" in the post-Gretzky era. None. Not one. All had an element of grit/toughness that could be quantified by a single player/line that played every game. The Wings didn't have that this season and haven't had that since Dallas Drake. 

 

The 1997 and 1998 Wings were both very tough and gritty teams. They could go toe to toe physically with any team in the league every game. That was an overall team toughness that hasn't been seen since on the Wings. It disappeared with the losses of Lapointe, Vladdy, Ward, and Kocur. These guys played minutes every game, and 2 of them were more than just big bodies and fists. In 2002 the Wings won the Cup with pure skill, but there was still a Grind Line. A line that could go out when you were down one and crash and bang and piss the other team off. That didn't exist this season. And hasn't since Downey was dropped. 

 

The 2008 Wings were not supposed to win the Cup. They were not as skilled as the Pens offensively and didn't match up physically. The Wings overall grit was better as their more physical players could actually contribute more than PIT's grinders. Plus, Dats and Z were physical and kept Crosby and Malkin in check every shift. Pavel and Z were both hurt this year and were not physical at all vs. BOS. That's bad news when they are supposed to be the shut down line. Kronwall can't be physical either, if he goes out of his way to level a guy it isn't Lidstrom picking up the slack, it's Brendan Smith. 

 

Grit, size, goaltending, and balanced lines win Cups in this era. Need at least 3 of those to make it to the Finals. Wings had half of one. Boston has 4. 


"I think a tough team, a team that sticks together, is a lot better than leaving the onus on one guy to take care of business." - Brendan Shanahan

 

It still would be nice to have that one guy.


#22 vladdy16

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Posted 28 April 2014 - 11:17 AM

"Class" is way overused.  I think what people really mean is respect - you can respect the guy you're trying to make a permanent part of the boards by making a clean, hard hit and not trying to take his head off, or not attempting to render him unable to reproduce.  Mr. Hockey was the toughest SOB of his time, but he had respect for the game and those that played it.    I think that's the big thing that's lacking now.  The retirement of players like Sakic and Yzerman has leeched that element from the game.


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#23 Rhah

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Posted 28 April 2014 - 03:14 PM

Not 100% sure this belongs here, but I just can't stand the two different ways refs call games in regular season vs post-season. Its a bit embarassing and the refs can be perfectly fine and consistent calling playoffs the same way they did the regular season. The only calling automatics like puck over glass, too many men on ice, and slashes that break sticks is a little silly because those are automatics but there are still the every so often called regular penalty that seems to be at the whim of the refs and only called like 25% of the time. And star players not getting anything called on them that might jeopardize ratings? What a joke.

 

I'd love to see the actual memo that tells these refs how to call playoffs that differs from how they did all year.

 

If in the Chicago-St.Louis game after the Backes hit, the head official can tell the guys no more after whistle scrums or we will call majors, and the rest of the game is called more like a regular non-goonery playoff game, why can't they call every playoff game like that? It was one of the best games to watch all playoffs so far and in my opinion was called a lot more like a normal regular season game.



#24 Barrie

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Posted 28 April 2014 - 03:31 PM

I blame the Owners for all the violence, cheap shots, and head hits. They could get rid of it by tomorrow, but they either don't want to or they're scared to make changes. I'm convinced they don't want to, and that they're trying to tap into the UFC market to generate more fans and revenue. With all the changes the NFL is making to clean up their game, hockey is now the most dangerous sport to play due to the speed and the lack of discipline and respect by some of the players.

 

Nothing's going to change until someone is either paralyzed or killed, or the league loses big in one of the upcoming lawsuits.


Edited by Barrie, 28 April 2014 - 03:34 PM.

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#25 dirtydangles

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Posted 28 April 2014 - 03:53 PM

I'd like to see some more class in how the NHL handles suspensions. The playoffs are just a high-stakes hockey game - that means if a player spears another player in the groin or smashes their head violently into the boards suspensions should be handed out. 

 

I'd also like to see suspensions/fines given for obvious cases of diving. While it may be hard to tell in most cases - some players make obvious attempts at diving that should go punished to prevent them from tricking the refs in the future. There have been cases of players high sticking themselves with the opposing player's stick and getting away with it - suspend that kind of behaviour. Currently diving is almost always called in addition to a trip or interference against the other team - this means the player diving doesn't have anything to lose on average. I'd like to see more calls go one way or the other.


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#26 evilmrt

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Posted 28 April 2014 - 06:16 PM

"Class" is way overused.  I think what people really mean is respect - you can respect the guy you're trying to make a permanent part of the boards by making a clean, hard hit and not trying to take his head off, or not attempting to render him unable to reproduce.  Mr. Hockey was the toughest SOB of his time, but he had respect for the game and those that played it.    I think that's the big thing that's lacking now.  The retirement of players like Sakic and Yzerman has leeched that element from the game.


You hit the nail on the head, absolutely what I was trying to get at in my post.

#27 WingsAlways

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Posted 28 April 2014 - 07:15 PM

Our 4th line played really well yesterday...really well.   As a part of the normal flow of the game, fighting is gone...forget about it.  If you want to waste a roster spot on some 6-5 250lb numbskull who's going to square off with the other team's numbskull, go ahead.  That isn't going to effect the outcome of the game. 

 

I see where you're coming from, but not everybody that's willing to square off to defend a teammate is a "numbskull". As a Wings fan, did you look at McCarty, Probert, or Kocur with the same outlook? 

 

On the contrary It affects the outcome quite a bit, either by momentum or by having a star player left alone because someone stood up to someone who was messing with them and made a statement.


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#28 Dabura

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Posted 29 April 2014 - 10:09 AM

Malik with a good rant about all the blatant assholery we've seen in just the first round:

 

http://kuklaskorner....old-time-hockey

 

I think this is what happens when you set a ridiculous precedent, namely $5,000. If you asked a hockey-savvy middle-income family if they'd be willing to shell out $5,000 for a chance at having their family name on the Cup, they'd probably consider it. If you asked a better-than-average National Hockey League player, who makes $5,000 every time he blinks, if he'd pay that price for a 50-50 shot at injuring a key opposing player in the playoffs, he might not think, "Hey, that's a great deal!" But he probably wouldn't think, "Wow, I really can't afford to do that."


Don't Toews me, bro!


#29 Dabura

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Posted 29 April 2014 - 10:22 AM

I blame the Owners for all the violence, cheap shots, and head hits. They could get rid of it by tomorrow, but they either don't want to or they're scared to make changes. I'm convinced they don't want to, and that they're trying to tap into the UFC market to generate more fans and revenue. With all the changes the NFL is making to clean up their game, hockey is now the most dangerous sport to play due to the speed and the lack of discipline and respect by some of the players.

 

Nothing's going to change until someone is either paralyzed or killed, or the league loses big in one of the upcoming lawsuits.

 

To be fair, ice hockey has always been one of the more dangerous pro team sports, for a variety of reasons. Blocking shots, for example. That's ludicrously dangerous, but it really is just part of the game.

 

I see an osteopathic doc, largely for hockey-related issues. He's hardcore Canadian, but he feels the game - even the cleanest check - is profoundly damaging to the body. Slip on the ice and fall on your ass, that could cause you problems in the long run. Someone whacks you in the head with a high stick, that could be a lot more than "Yeah, he kinda clipped me a bit. But my head is still attached to my body, so it's all good."
 

It's a brutal, brutal, brutal, brutal sport. Beautiful and awesome and at times even artistic, yes. But, without question, brutal.


Don't Toews me, bro!


#30 Dabura

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Posted 29 April 2014 - 11:48 AM

I see where you're coming from, but not everybody that's willing to square off to defend a teammate is a "numbskull". As a Wings fan, did you look at McCarty, Probert, or Kocur with the same outlook? 

 

On the contrary It affects the outcome quite a bit, either by momentum or by having a star player left alone because someone stood up to someone who was messing with them and made a statement.

 

I think we have to realize it's not the '80s anymore. The (Chuck) Norris Division, where all you had to was look at a guy the wrong way and you'd have an epic line brawl - those days are long gone. You see it resurface now and then, here and there - but, for the most part, Jungle Law doesn't govern like it used to. The game has changed. Speed and skill and depth and cerebral line matchups and efficient, controlled, effective physicality are the new school. Standards have changed. The societal landscape has changed. Moral and ethical lines have shifted. We are, for better or for worse (for better), more informed, more careful, more politically correct. Also, today's average NHLer is bigger, stronger, faster, more physically imposing than he's ever been.

 

The biggest thing, though? I think it's simply the heightened pressure to win. It's the parity.

 

Which is better: Having a protector, or not having a protector? If it were that simple, we'd all take the protector. But in the age of parity and the cap, the question tends to be something closer to "Do I want a defensively responsible guy who can kill penalties and maybe take that faceoff in our end when we're up a goal with 30 seconds left and the other team has pulled the goalie and we just iced the puck - or do I want a guy who you know what never mind I want the guy who's killing penalties and taking that d-zone faceoff." Parity means two points are never free. You have to bring your A game every night and ice the roster that gives you the best chance of securing those two points or taking a game in a playoff series. If your judgment as a coach or general manager slips even a little, it can be a five-game losing streak, which might cost you a playoff berth. Because it's that competitive now.


Don't Toews me, bro!


#31 Firefighter4WingedWheel

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Posted 29 April 2014 - 12:21 PM

Going in the same vein of "what sells tickets" I really get tired of hearing non-hockey enthusists say "I only watch for the fights."  It is this type of audience that is pushing the NHL in this direction of "do whatever it takes to sell tickets."  To those people I just shake my head and walk away.  Or if I'm feeling really hockey-like, I grab their shirt and punch them in the head. :lol:


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#32 GMRwings1983

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Posted 29 April 2014 - 08:21 PM

 

I think we have to realize it's not the '80s anymore. The (Chuck) Norris Division, where all you had to was look at a guy the wrong way and you'd have an epic line brawl - those days are long gone. You see it resurface now and then, here and there - but, for the most part, Jungle Law doesn't govern like it used to. The game has changed. Speed and skill and depth and cerebral line matchups and efficient, controlled, effective physicality are the new school. Standards have changed. The societal landscape has changed. Moral and ethical lines have shifted. We are, for better or for worse (for better), more informed, more careful, more politically correct. Also, today's average NHLer is bigger, stronger, faster, more physically imposing than he's ever been.

 

The biggest thing, though? I think it's simply the heightened pressure to win. It's the parity.

 

Which is better: Having a protector, or not having a protector? If it were that simple, we'd all take the protector. But in the age of parity and the cap, the question tends to be something closer to "Do I want a defensively responsible guy who can kill penalties and maybe take that faceoff in our end when we're up a goal with 30 seconds left and the other team has pulled the goalie and we just iced the puck - or do I want a guy who you know what never mind I want the guy who's killing penalties and taking that d-zone faceoff." Parity means two points are never free. You have to bring your A game every night and ice the roster that gives you the best chance of securing those two points or taking a game in a playoff series. If your judgment as a coach or general manager slips even a little, it can be a five-game losing streak, which might cost you a playoff berth. Because it's that competitive now.

 

We need a protector

 

The-Bodyguard-Poster.jpg


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