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Hey Hey Hockeytown!

Member Since 02 Jul 2009
Offline Last Active Jul 03 2009 06:06 AM
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Wings will re-sign Leino to a 2-year deal

03 July 2009 - 01:46 AM

QUOTE
The San Jose Mercury News initially reported this whopper of a Red Wings-related tidbit...

July 3, Mercury News: Detroit may announce a two-year deal for restricted free-agent forward Ville Leino as early as today. But general manager Ken Holland is "not optimistic" that he'll be able to keep unrestricted free agent Mikael Samuelsson, who is seeking a long-term deal averaging upwards of $2 million a year.

Which is part of a superb report by the Free Press's Helene St. James, detailing the Red Wings' attempts to re-sign Ville Leino and Jiri Hudler:

July 3, Detroit Free Press: The Red Wings may announce a two-year deal for restricted free agent forward Ville Leino as early as today.

But general manager Ken Holland said Thursday he's "not optimistic" that he'll be able to keep unrestricted free agent Mikael Samuelsson, who is seeking a long-term deal averaging upwards of $2 million a year. The Wings want to keep Samuelsson closer to $1.5 million a year.

Restricted free agent Jiri Hudler plans on filing for arbitration before the weekend. At that point, the Wings can choose whether the arbitrator should decide on a one-year or two-year deal. Hudler, 25, who made $1.15 million last season, will see his salary increase anywhere from the $2.5 million the Wings are offering to possibly an award in the $3.5-million to $4-million range. If the Wings don't like the arbitrator's number, they can trade Hudler.

"The math is simple," Holland said. "At the end of the day, when the season began we had five guys who were in line to become unrestricteds. We were proactive with two -- we got Henrik Zetterberg done, and then we got Johan Franzen done. I'd like to have Sammy back. I'd like to have Hudler back. But it's a cap world. We can only do so much."

Filing for arbitration, in case you didn't know, locks a player into finding a contract solution with his NHL team--whether that means that the two agree to a contract before arbitration, that the team agrees to the joint NHL-NHLPA-appointed arbiter's decision, that the team agrees to the offer and trades that player's rights, or, very rarely, that the team simply walks away from the player and basically dares other teams to bid over the offer. It precludes other teams from firing restricted free agent offer sheets a player's way.

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