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About Zymz

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    Jr. Prospect
  • Birthday 11/16/1980

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    Houghton, Michigan
  • Interests
    Hockey, music, computers

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  1. This sounds to me like an "out" for both the Wings and Hudler. Neither side wants Hudler to play anywhere else in the League, but the recognition is there that Hudler can't be signed for any deserved amount of money (you have to believe that for the Wings to fit Hudler under the cap, they'd have to go so low that the NHLPA would be screaming about salary implications, even IF Hudler would take the deal...) So Hudler plays in the KHL until a reasonable deal can be worked out (probably summer 2010, when the Wings get cap flexibility back), re-signs with the Wings to a long-term deal, and everybody's happy... Yes the Wings lose a solid PP specialist for a season - but better he goes to Russia then say, the Blackhawks.
  2. Hmm... down the middle - Datsyuk, Zetterberg, Filppula, Draper... Will the Red Wings even have to play defence? They'll always have the puck!
  3. Everything I've seen and read so far makes me think Hossa *wanted* to be a Red Wing, offer or no. I don't think this signing is only to win a Cup, but to try and make this work out for the rest of his career. How awesome is that? It's quite conceivable that a year from now, Hossa might still turn down bigger offers from elsewhere just to stay with the Wings...
  4. Hossa signing with the Wings for less money just to win a Cup would be the single dumbest career move he could ever make. The guy is 29 yrs old and will never be worth more than he is now. He's got about 10 yrs (barring injury) left to win a Cup, so why wouldn't he sign with an up-and-comer, turn them into a contender AND make the big bucks, all while having only a slightly less chance at winning it all. I would love nothing more than Hossa to be a Wing (he's always been one of my favs), but it just makes no sense. You also have to take the NHLPA into account - which is probably why Sundin is hesitant to sign for cheap - they're going to pressure the stars hard to take the biggest contracts out there.
  5. Funny thing about Orpik... They all talk about the legendary "4 hit" shift in the SCF, but if I remember correctly, all those hits came because Orpik was consistently beat to the puck, and it took him 4 tries to separate it from the Wings. Not to mention at least 2 or 3 of those hits were in the corner and against the boards, where it's much easier to line a player up. Orpik was solid at times, and he's a hell of a warrior, but he's no 3M dollar man...
  6. Prospal would be a great fit on the Wings. He's a solid two-way player that can play on just about any line and chip in 20-30 goals. He's shown that he can be a playoff-type guy, too; he can score the ugly goals as well as the pretty ones. That he's underpaid (in my opinion, anyway) makes him even more attractive to the Wings. Contrary to what a lot of people have been posting, he does NOT need great players around him to get his goals - he's been on several second- and even third-line stints throughout his career. He'd also bring badly need help to the second pp unit. And he's not so old or expensive that the team couldn't keep him around for a couple years while the young'uns develop into more solid players (Flip, Hudler, and Kopecky just aren't quite there yet.) All in all, an upper-middle prospect like Emerson and a pick (maybe two) would be a fair price for Prospal.
  7. The three goalies for WC All-Stars: Nabokov, San Jose -can't deny his brilliance this year, playing all of San Jose's 41 games (winning 23) and still posting near all-star numbers (2.01 GAA/.917 sv%) Leclair, Columbus -playing lights-out (in a goalie-friendly system, i know, but who else do you take, Rick Nash?) with a gaudy 1.97 GAA/.928 sv% Bryzgalov, Phoenix -no coincidence Phoenix started winning when this dude showed up, and I think that speaks for itself. 2.15 GAA/.930 sv% helps too I'd love to see Ozzie make the game (he definitely DOES deserve it) but with the Wings having 3 starters and Rafalski being a good shot (not many healthy standout D-men in the West this year) I just don't see it happening...
  8. Unless there's a deal offered that Kenny just can't refuse, I don't see him making a big splash this year in trades. The team's coming together and playing well, the demand for prospects and picks is insane, and the return on investment just isn't there. Sellers are gonna ask for the farm for 3 month rentals, and buyers are gonna mortgage their future for marginal improvements. Barring injuries (in which case Kenny might be forced to pull a trade), the current team is what we'll see in the playoffs, with maybe a minor tweak or two.
  9. A little off-topic here, but I don't think there's been as promising a group of young stars (1-3 yrs in the league) as the current crop since the early 90s - maybe even better - as evidenced by some of the favorites people have been posting. First and foremost, you got Crosby and Ovechkin, whom it's hard to believe are in only their 3rd years, along with Phaneuf and Vanek. There are some up-and-coming young goalies (though they tend to be older): Lundqvist, Fleury, Backstrom. Then there's the rookies and sophomores: Malkin, Toews, Kane, Statsny, Kopitar, Andrew Cogliano, David Perron, the Johnsons (Erik and Jack), Sam Gagner, Phil Kessel, Mark and Jordan Staal, and God knows whom else I've missed (these were just off the top of my head.) Great time to be a hockey fan!
  10. Spezza Gaborik Hossa Luongo Lecavalier
  11. Maybe if he played with Joe Thornton...
  12. That's exactly Hudler's game. His goal last night is a perfect example of what Hudler's role will be on this team. He snuck into an opening on the backside of the play for an easy redirect.
  13. Eva, I respect your attempt at an objective, statistical argument for any given team, but there is at least one big flaw in your method: There is no accounting for strength of schedule. Just as a small example, one could make an argument that the '96 Avs and '97 Flyers teams were significantly better than the '98 Capitals and '02 'Canes, thereby skewing your 'clutch modifier' with closer goal differentials for the '96 and '97 series than the '98 and '02 (not sure if this is actually true, but it's just to illustrate my point.) Perhaps this strength of schedule averages out over an entire regular season/playoff run, but I doubt it. Also, there are numerous smaller things that could be accounted for - such as injuries, payroll, etc. - which would paint a more accurate team vs. team comparison. One last thing: I can't put my finger on exactly why, but it seems the clutch modifier carries more weight than it should (the '98 Wings get a 79% bonus based on one category while the '96 Wings take a 64% hit???) Edit: typo and clarification
  14. The only way Tampa Bay gets rid of Lecavalier is to dump salary and rebuild, and the Wings have nothing to offer TB in that regard. The Lightning would want a top-tier prospect and maybe even a pick or two on top of that, and the team Lecavalier would end up on would have to have big salary-cap room (Lecavalier's got 2 years left at $6.75 mil per, I believe, plus is gonna get a raise.) Trading Datsyuk or Zetterberg for Lecavalier kinda defeats the purpose, dontcha think?
  15. Lets keep thigns in perspective here. In Grigorenko, we have a player who was probably coddled a bit on his Russian teams. He could get by over there on talent alone, and never really learned the value of working hard and earning a spot. Now, he's here in the US - no friends, very little ability to communicate, and he's not really ready. What he needs is a mentor, not an executioner. Someone who can help him adjust to NHL hockey (heck, even AHL hockey is a level higher than REL.) The only guy in the Wings' system that fits the bill is Datsyuk, who's been right where Grigorenko is now. Keep this in mind: Datsyuk was in a similar position when he came over, and had guys like Larionov and Fedorov to help him learn the ropes. If not for the veteran Russians on the team in Datsyuk's early days, he'd likely be back in Russia now. I think some prolonged exposure working with the veteran Europeans on the big club will have a huge impact on Grigorenko, and perhaps when he's more comfortable later this season, he'll be willing to return to the Griffins to get ready for next season. Yes, it sucks that he's taking away roster spots from hard-working, hard-nosed energy guys like Ellis, Downey and Kopecky, but face it, who's the bigger payoff? Players like those three are a dime a dozen, guys with top-notch hands and a penchant for scoring aren't...