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Death Warrant

Derek Boogaard found dead

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Just throwing in a quote from the article:

A trove of documents, compiled by Boogaard’s father, offer a rare prescription-by-prescription history of the care given to a prominent, physically ailing athlete who struggled with addiction to some of the very drugs the team doctors were providing. The scores of prescriptions came before and after Boogaard’s entry into the league’s substance-abuse program in September 2009 for an addiction to painkillers and sleeping pills.

Among the findings:

¶ In a six-month stretch from October 2008 to April 2009, while playing 51 games, Boogaard received at least 25 prescriptions for the painkillers hydrocodone or oxycodone, a total of 622 pills, from 10 doctors — eight team doctors of the Wild, an oral surgeon in Minneapolis and a doctor for another N.H.L. team.

¶ In the fall of 2010, an official for the Rangers, Boogaard’s new team, was notified of Boogaard’s recurring abuse of narcotic pain pills. Nonetheless, a Rangers team dentist soon wrote the first of five prescriptions for hydrocodone for Boogaard after he sustained an injury.

¶ Another Rangers doctor, although aware that Boogaard also had been addicted to sleeping pills in the past, wrote nearly 10 prescriptions for Ambien during Boogaard’s lone season with the team.

The records reveal the ease with which Boogaard received prescription drugs — often shortly after sending a text message to a team doctor’s cellphone and without a notation made in team medical files. They also show the breadth of the drugs being prescribed, from flu medications and decongestants to antidepressants and anti-anxiety pills.

Most striking, though, are the narcotic painkillers and sleeping pills, which Boogaard had a history of abusing.

He had so access to so many doctors that it certainly would be difficult to keep track of all the meds he was on. Still, all these doctors should recognize a drug-seeking patient when they see one.

RIP Boogaard

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Just throwing in a quote from the article:

He had so access to so many doctors that it certainly would be difficult to keep track of all the meds he was on. Still, all these doctors should recognize a drug-seeking patient when they see one.

RIP Boogaard

It is quite sad to read that

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1338854710[/url]' post='2305244']

I wish it read "another ex-Rangers doctor".

The sad part is you have to imagine that some sort of this conversation happened, "give our players whatever they want, or I'll find a medical team coach that will". "if they hurt, make them feel better." it's really the culture of sports.

Just like when Colt McCoy was clearly knocked retarded, the coaching staff STILL put him out there. All they had to say was "our bad", and it more or less went away.

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Guest Shoreline

Just throwing in a quote from the article:

He had so access to so many doctors that it certainly would be difficult to keep track of all the meds he was on. Still, all these doctors should recognize a drug-seeking patient when they see one.

RIP Boogaard

Doctors can't really be expected to police every individual's life for them.

Sorry Boogaard had to pay such a high price, but was a big boy, he made stupid choices, hopefully as a positive lesson others can learn from that before they make conscious choices to abuse drugs of any kind, including prescription meds.

Edited by Shoreline

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Doctors can't really be expected to police every individual's life for them.

Sorry Boogaard had to pay such a high price, but was a big boy, he made stupid choices, hopefully as a positive lesson others can learn from that before they make conscious choices to abuse drugs of any kind, including prescription meds.

I'm not expecting them to police every aspect of a players life, nor am I saying it's their fault and not Boogaard's, but they also have a responsibility to do no harm. If they're writing that many prescriptions when they don't even really see him as a patient, they're basically just drug suppliers not doctors.

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Each doctor treats independently from each other, but pharmacies are supposed to keep track of sales of highly abused drugs. If someone is getting multiple prescriptions from multiple doctors and getting them filled at multiple pharmacies, that is a huge sign of abuse.

I don't know about other states, but in ND when someone gets a prescription filled, they go on a list and if there are multiples, they get red flagged. I have no idea what happens after that. I don't know if the doctors are notified, or what happens, but someone knows about it.

On the other hand, this is normal people I'm talking about. Hockey players have so many different maladies that the rest of us don't have, or at least don't have in rapid succession.

They probably need pain killers way more frequently, and for more things than the rest of us. They have chronic pains and a variety of temporary issues, all of which could require pain killers individually.

I'm still upset over Boo dying, but I don't fault anyone in it. It was what it was. Could someone have done something? I don't know. He went through the rehab. After that, it's up to him. You can only help someone so far.

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