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Rob the Badger

What are you reading right now?

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Guest DetroitIan   
Guest DetroitIan

Im actually quite ashamed. Cause I havent read a full book(a book not assigned by a prof.) in probably almost 2 years. Im definitely gonna get back into it soon. I heard "Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas" is an amazing read. I think that's my next book.

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Right now, it's Scott Turow's "Ordinary Heroes", set during World War II. My tastes are pretty eclectic, and the next one up is John Grisham's "A Painted House".

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Right now, it's Scott Turow's "Ordinary Heroes", set during World War II. My tastes are pretty eclectic, and the next one up is John Grisham's "A Painted House".

Kira, "A Painted House" by John Grisham is good, very different from his usually crime/ law thrillers. I read it a few years ago . . .

I just finished "QBQ: The Question Behind the Question" by John Miller- great book about eliminating blame and procrastination (also, it a quick read 115 pg!).

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Just started up school again so im rather swamped with course readings, but i'd have to recommend John Krakauer's "Into the Wild" to everyone. Its an amazing book. Trust me, it wont let you down. I read the book about two years ago and it still haunts me.

P.S. the movie is coming out in 2 weeks starring Emile Hirsch and produced by Sean Penn. READ THE BOOK FIRST!

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Update on A Short History of Tractors In Ukraine:

It makes me feel helpless biologically as a man.

It has a lot of great parallels, so if you pick up on subtle symbolism, this one is fun to pick through.

It's almost like a mystery, too, and it has kept me wondering.

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I'm currently reading both "A Feast for Crows" by George RR Martin and the short stories at the end of "I Am Legend"

Great Series...HBO has bought the rights to turn this series into a show. They plan to make each book a last a season, which means that George needs to improve on his recent performances as far as kicking the books out faster. Waiting 3-5 years between books isn't going to cut it...

I'm reading Eldest by Christopher Paolini...This is the sequel to Eragon, which was made into a decent movie (of course, not as good as the book, but what movies are?)

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I can't believe none of you have mentioned James Patterson. If you like blood and guts crime stories, his Alex Cross series is the one for you. A couple have been made into movies - Along came a Spider and Kiss the GIrls. I believe both starred Morgan Freeman. But be sure and get the book list, they are supposed to be read in order. There are 11 in this series and I have read them all. He has a womens murder club series of 6 books and I'm reading the sixth one of that series. It's amazing that he can write such gruesome murder stories and then turn around and write a book called Sams Letters to Jennifer that is soooo sweet and touching. I'm hooked on his books.

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I too seem to have somehow missed this thread..

I have a stack of books waiting to be read but in the last couple of months I managed to complete Breakfast of Champions, Justinian's Flea, Guns, Germs, and Steel and All Quiet on the Western Front.

Breakfast of Champions is Vonnegut at his best although I didn't enjoy it quite as much as Slaughter House 5.

I would highly recommend Guns, Germs, and Steel to anyone who hasn't read it yet... It's really a fascinating explanation of 100,000 years of human history in just 500 pages.

I've finally decided to tackle Plato's Republic(i've been avoiding it for years) and am currently slogging through it... Then hopefully on to something a bit more light.

Edit: I almost forgot, if you haven't read All quiet on the Western Front yet, pick it up... it's a really short but moving read.

Edited by omnipotent_hudler

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Currently re-reading, Filth, by Irvine Welsh. It's probably my favorite of his books.

Amazon description:

Amazon.com

Talk about truth in advertising! Irvine Welsh's novel about an evil Edinburgh cop is filthy enough to please the most crud-craving fans of his blockbuster debut, Trainspotting. Like Trainspotting, Filth matches its nastiness with a maniacal, deeply peeved sense of humor. Though one does feel the need to escape this train wreck of a narrative from time to time for a shower and some chamomile tea, just as often Welsh provokes a belly laugh with an extraordinarily perverse and cruelly funny set piece. Nicely violent turns of phrase litter the ghastly landscape of his tale.

Our hero, Detective Sergeant Bruce Robertson, is a cross between Harvey Keitel in Bad Lieutenant and John Belushi in Animal House. His task is to nab a killer who has brained the son of the Ghanaian ambassador, but bigoted Bruce is more urgently concerned with coercing sex from teenage Ecstasy dealers, planning vice tours of Amsterdam, and mulling over his lurid love life. He's also got a tapeworm, whose monologue is printed right down the middle of many pages. Here's one of this unusually articulate parasite's realizations: "My problem is that I seem to have quite a simple biological structure with no mechanism for the transference of all my grand and noble thoughts into fine deeds."

Welsh's real strength is comic tough talk and inventive slang. The murder mystery helps organize his tendency to sprawl, but the engine of his art is wry, harsh dialogue. At one point, his books hogged the entire top half of Scotland's Top Ten Bestsellers list--and half the buyers of Trainspotting had never bought a book before. The reason is not that Welsh is the best novelist who ever got short-listed for the Booker Prize. It is that he is that rarest of phenomena, an original voice. --Tim Appelo

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So I finally finished "A Feast for Crows" and have moved on to Wilbur Smith's newest "Taita" book The Quest. I will probably be reading a book on simplifying your life by throwing stuff out, I think it's called "It's All Too Much" or something similar next.

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Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance by Robert M Pirsig

Great book. I'm reading for a second time and am enjoying it just as much.

Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance: An Inquiry into Values is the first of Robert M. Pirsig's texts in which he explores the Metaphysics of quality. The 1974 book describes a seventeen-day motorcycle journey across the United States by an unnamed father and his son Chris, joined for nine days by John and Sylvia Sutherland, a befriended couple. The trip is punctuated by numerous philosophical discussions (many of them on epistemology and the philosophy of science) which the author refers to as chautauquas.

The book sold millions of copies in twenty-seven languages and was described by the press as "the most widely read philosophy book, ever."

The title is an incongruous play on the title of the book Zen in the Art of Archery by Eugen Herrigel. In its introduction, Pirsig explains that, despite its title, "it should in no way be associated with that great body of factual information relating to orthodox Zen Buddhist practice. It's not very factual on motorcycles, either."

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